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Þorrinn

January 24 - February 20

Þorrinn or also called Thorrablot was a sacrificial midwinter festival offered to the gods in pagan Iceland of the past. It was abolished during the Christianization of Iceland, but resurrected in the 19th century as a midwinter celebration that continues to be celebrated to this day. The timing for the festival coincides with the month of Thorri, according to the old Icelandic calendar, which begins on the first Friday after January 19th (the 13th week of winter). 

Origins of the name "Thorri" are unclear but it is most likely derived from Norwegian king Thorri Snærsson, or Thor the God of Thunder in the old Nordic religion.

On this occasion, locals come together to eat, drink and be merry. Customary, the menu consists of unusual culinary delicacies, known as traditional Icelandic food. These will include rotten shark’s meat (hákarl), boiled sheep’s head, (svið) and congealed sheep’s blood wrapped in a ram’s stomach (blóðmör)! This is traditionally washed down with some Brennivin - also known as Black Death – a potent schnapps made from potato and caraway.

After the Thorrablot dinner traditional songs, games and story telling are accompanied by dancing and in true Icelandic style continue until the early hours of the morning! If you fail to receive a personal invitation to a family feast, local restaurants will often add Thorrablot colour and taste to their menus.

More Events in January

January 6

The Thirteenth

The thirteenth, and last, day of Christmas. Festivities are held all over the country, with elf themed bonfires and fireworks.
January 24-26

Reykjavík International Games

Reykjavík International Games is a multi sport event that will take place from January 24th -26th 2020. The competition will mostly take place in Laugardalur, the Valley of Sport.
January 25 - February 1

Dark Music days

Dark Music Days is a festival of contemporary and new music which takes place during the darkest period of the Icelandic winter.